Racial differences in maternal risk factors associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes: a population-based study exploring urban and rural geographies in the United States

Shondra Loggins Clay, Markisha J. Woodson, Jennifer A. Makelarski, W. Susan Cheng, Reginald J. Alston, Jeffrey Trask, Terence Hodges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This paper explores racial differences in maternal risk factors associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes across urban and rural geographies using 2019 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Bivariate chi-square tests and logistic regression were performed which showed statistically significant geographical differences among Non-Hispanic (NH) Black pregnant women across income levels (p = .016) and perceived health status (p = .003). Regression analyses indicated an increased racial gap between NH White pregnant women and other racial/ethnic groups. The findings support that there are statistically significant racial differences in maternal risk factors across urban and rural geographies for NH Black and Hispanic pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-33
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Keywords

  • Racial disparities
  • geographical environments
  • health behaviors
  • pregnancy
  • race and ethnicity
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education

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