Race as a Moderator in a Model of Sexual Harassment: An Empirical Test

Mindy E. Bergman, Fritz Drasgow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

L. F. Fitzgerald, C. L. Hulin, and F. Drasgow (1995) proposed that victim characteristics, such as race, might moderate the relationships between sexual harassment and its job, psychological, and health status outcomes. This study describes 2 theoretical positions, tokenism and double jeopardy, that could account for this possible moderation by race, as well as the alternative view that no moderating effects exist. The effects of race are empirically examined through simultaneous path analysis. Results indicate that whereas mean levels of harassment differ across race, the phenomenon of sexual harassment unfolds similarly across races; race is not a moderator of the relationships between sexual harassment and the variables proposed as its antecedents and outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-145
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of occupational health psychology
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Race as a Moderator in a Model of Sexual Harassment: An Empirical Test'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this