Quick fiber process: Effect of mash temperature, dry solids, and residual germ on fiber yield and purity

J. Wahjudi, L. Xu, P. Wang, V. Singh, P. Buriak, K. D. Rausch, A. J. McAloo, M. E. Tumbleson, S. R. Eckhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Preliminary calculations showed that recovery of fiber before fermentation in the dry grind ethanol facilities known as the Quick Fiber process increases fermenter capacity and reduces ethanol production cost by as much as 4 cents/gal. The objective of the current research was to evaluate the effect of mash temperature, dry solids, and residual germ on fiber yield and purity when using the quick fiber process. Fiber was recovered by flotation and skimming, while maintaining a specified temperature, dry solids, and residual germ in the mash. Varying temperature and dry solids in the mash resulted in a statistically significant effect on the fiber yield, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content, and weight of NDF/100 g of dry corn. Varying residual germ in the mash resulted in statistically significant differences for NDF through dilution and the weight of NDF/100 g of dry corn. The highest fiber yield was 10.9% at 45°C, 23% dry solids, and 15% residual germ; the highest NDF was 50.9% at 30°C, 21% dry solids, and 0% residual germ. The highest weight of NDF/100 g of dry corn was observed at 45°C, 23% dry solids, and 0% residual germ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)640-644
Number of pages5
JournalCereal Chemistry
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Organic Chemistry

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