Quantitative Infrared Photoelasticity of Silicon Photovoltaic Wafers Using a Discrete Dislocation Model

T. W. Lin, G. P. Horn, H. T. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Residual stress and crystalline defects in silicon wafers can affect solar cell reliability and performance. Infrared photoelastic measurements are performed for stress mapping in monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) wafers and compared to photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The wafer stresses are then quantified using a discrete dislocationbased numerical modeling approach, which leads to simulated photoelastic images. The model accounts for wafer stress relaxation due to dislocation structures. The wafer strain energy is then analyzed with respect to the orientation of the dislocation structures. The simulation shows that particular locations on the wafer have only limited slip systems that reduce the wafer strain energy. Experimentally observed dislocation structures are consistent with these observations from the analysis, forming the basis for a more quantitative infrared photoelasticity-based inspection method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number011001
JournalJournal of Applied Mechanics, Transactions ASME
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • discrete dislocation modeling
  • photoelasticity
  • residual thermal stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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