Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios

Sophia C. Dent, Dale L. Hutchinson, Kristin M. Hedman, Matthew A. Fort, Stanley H. Ambrose

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

Objectives Relatively long digits are considered to enhance grasping performance in primates. We tested whether growth‐related changes in intrinsic hand and foot proportions may have behavioral implications for growing animals, by examining whether ontogenetic changes in digital proportions are related to variation in voluntary grasping behaviors in baboons. Materials and methods Longitudinal morphological and behavioral data were collected on 6 captive olive baboons (Papio anubis) as they aged from 5 to 22 months. The length of digits and metapodials, measured from radiographs, were used to calculate phalangeal indices (i.e., PIs: summed length of non‐distal phalanges relative to corresponding metapodial length). We also examined the allometric scaling of digital bones relative to body mass. We observed baboon positional behaviors over a 15‐day period following the radiographic sessions, quantifying the frequency of forelimb and hindlimb grasping behaviors. Results PIs for all digits declined during growth, a result of the differential scaling of metapodials (which scaled to body mass with isometry) versus phalanges (which scaled with negative allometry). The incidence of forelimb and hindlimb grasping behaviors declined with age. Though we found no relationship between forelimb grasping and hand proportions, the incidence of hindlimb grasping was directly correlated with postaxial digit PIs. Discussion Only changes in the intrinsic proportions of the pedal digits are associated with variation in grasping activity in growing baboons. This finding accords previous biomechanical and neuroanatomical studies showing distinct functional roles for the hands and feet during primate locomotion, and has important implications for reconstructing primate locomotor evolution.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages65
Number of pages1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Event2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists - Austin, United States
Duration: Apr 11 2018Apr 14 2018
Conference number: 87

Conference

Conference2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists
CountryUnited States
CityAustin
Period4/11/184/14/18

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Dental Calculus
Forelimb
Papio
Carbonates
Hindlimb
Papio anubis
Isotopes
Primates
Foot
Hand
Bone and Bones
Incidence
Locomotion
Growth

Keywords

  • ISAS

Cite this

Dent, S. C., Hutchinson, D. L., Hedman, K. M., Fort, M. A., & Ambrose, S. H. (2018). Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios. 65. Abstract from 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Austin, United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23489

Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios. / Dent, Sophia C.; Hutchinson, Dale L.; Hedman, Kristin M.; Fort, Matthew A.; Ambrose, Stanley H.

2018. 65 Abstract from 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Austin, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Dent, SC, Hutchinson, DL, Hedman, KM, Fort, MA & Ambrose, SH 2018, 'Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios' 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Austin, United States, 4/11/18 - 4/14/18, pp. 65. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23489
Dent SC, Hutchinson DL, Hedman KM, Fort MA, Ambrose SH. Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios. 2018. Abstract from 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Austin, United States. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23489
Dent, Sophia C. ; Hutchinson, Dale L. ; Hedman, Kristin M. ; Fort, Matthew A. ; Ambrose, Stanley H. / Purification of dental calculus organic and carbonate biofractions improves correlations with bone stable isotope ratios. Abstract from 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, Austin, United States.1 p.
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