Protein adsorption mechanisms determine the efficiency of thermally controlled cell adhesion on poly(N -isopropyl acrylamide) brushes

Sangwook Choi, Byung Chan Choi, Changying Xue, Deborah E Leckband

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of the protein adsorption mechanism(s) on the efficiency of thermally controlled cell adhesion and release from poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) brushes. Large format polymer gradients were used to screen for grafting densities and substrate chemistries that alter both cell adhesion at 37 °C and rapid cell release at 25 °C. In particular, the grafting conditions investigated allowed protein adsorption to the underlying substrate, penetration of the brush only, or adsorption to the outer edge of the film. At an average molecular weight of 30 kDa (degree of polymerization N ∼ 270), the results show that robust protein adsorption to polymer brushes impairs rapid cell release below the lower critical solution temperature. Conversely, grafting conditions that permit protein penetration of the brush but block strong adsorption to the underlying substrate support cell adhesion above the transition temperature and ensure efficient cell recovery at lower temperature. These findings demonstrate the impact of protein adsorption mechanisms, surface chemistry, and polymer properties on thermally controlled cell capture and release.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)92-100
Number of pages9
JournalBiomacromolecules
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 14 2013

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Cell adhesion
Brushes
Proteins
Adsorption
Polymers
Substrates
Surface chemistry
Superconducting transition temperature
poly-N-isopropylacrylamide
Molecular weight
Polymerization
Recovery
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Protein adsorption mechanisms determine the efficiency of thermally controlled cell adhesion on poly(N -isopropyl acrylamide) brushes. / Choi, Sangwook; Choi, Byung Chan; Xue, Changying; Leckband, Deborah E.

In: Biomacromolecules, Vol. 14, No. 1, 14.01.2013, p. 92-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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