Protection of extract from leaves of Ardisia compressa against benomyl-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes

M. V. Ramírez-Mares, S. Fatell, S. Villa-Treviño, E. González De Mejía

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The potential of the Ardisia compressa extract (EA) was examined regarding its capacity to reduce the cytotoxic effect of benomyl on rat hepatocytes. The protective effect was evaluated by Janus Green dye exclusion method. An approximate 50% cytotoxic effect of benomyl on hepatocytes was observed at 35μg/ml after 2hr of incubation. (-)Epigallocatechin 3-gallato (EGCG) and EA decreased the viability of hepatocytes at concentrations above 3μg/ml and 2.52μg, equivalent to (+)catechin/ml, respectively. A protective effect against benomyl was observed when hepatocytes were previously exposed to EGCG (3μg/ml) or EA (2.52μg, equivalent to (+)catechin/ml) followed by incubation with benomyl (35μg/ml) alone. When EGCG or EA were in contact with cells, either simultaneously or after pretreatment with benomyl, did not protect hepatocytes. EGCG (1.3x10-2 μg/ml) or EA (9.8x10-2 μg, equivalent to (+)catechin/ml) inhibited 57% and 34%, respectively, the unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) induced by benomyl at a concentration of 23x10-2 μM, when both were incubated with hepatocytes prior to benomyl. The simultaneous incubation of benomyl with EGCG or EA did not protect the cell against the genotoxic effect of benomyl. These results indicate that the dried leaves extract of Ardisia compressa protect rat hepatocytes from benomyl-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)889-896
Number of pages8
JournalToxicology in Vitro
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Ardisia
  • Benomyl
  • Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Protection of extract from leaves of Ardisia compressa against benomyl-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in cultured rat hepatocytes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this