Protecting Drinking Water by Reducing Uncertainties Associated with Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Deep Saline Aquifers

William R. Roy, Brynne A. Storsved, Keith C. Hackley, Yu-Feng Forrest Lin, Richard J. Rice, Shane K. Butler, Sally M. Benson, Walton R. Kelly, Jared T. Freiburg, Samuel V. Panno, Chittaranjan Ray, Christian Strandli, Edward Mehnert, J. Krothe, Lois Yoksoulian, Matteo D'Alessio, N.C. Krothe, Nathaniel Adams, Peter Berger, Zohreh Askari-Khorasgani

Research output: Book/Report/Conference proceedingTechnical report

Abstract

Protecting Drinking Water by Reducing Uncertainties Associated With Geologic Carbon Sequestration in Deep Saline Aquifers was developed with an overarching goal of protecting underground sources of drinking water from potential threats from geological carbon sequestration (GCS). GCS is a process of permanently storing greenhouse gases in the subsurface rather than discharging them to the atmosphere. This technology is considered by scientists and policy makers to be a feasible approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and addressing global climate change (IPCC, 2005; Socolow and Pacala, 2006; IEA, 2013). For GCS projects, monitoring, verification and assessment (MVA) procedures are conducted to demonstrate that the sequestered carbon dioxide (CO2) is securely and permanently stored in the subsurface (USDOE, 2012). MVA procedures include atmospheric, hydrological, geochemical, and geophysical monitoring techniques, and generally include modeling of these data. Our research efforts were designed to reduce uncertainties associated with selected MVA data and associated modeling procedures.
Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • ISGS
  • ISWS

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