Programming structure into 3D nanomaterials

Dara Van Gough, Abigail T. Juhl, Paul V. Braun

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Programming three dimensional nanostructures into materials is becoming increasingly important given the need for ever more highly functional solids. Applications for materials with complex programmed structures include solar energy harvesting, energy storage, molecular separation, sensors, pharmaceutical agent delivery, nanoreactors and advanced optical devices. Here we discuss examples of molecular and optical routes to program the structure of three-dimensional nanomaterials with exquisite control over nanomorphology and the resultant properties and conclude with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges of such an approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-35
Number of pages8
JournalMaterials Today
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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solar energy
energy storage
programming
Nanostructured materials
delivery
routes
Nanoreactors
Energy harvesting
sensors
Optical devices
Drug products
Energy storage
Solar energy
Nanostructures
Sensors
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Programming structure into 3D nanomaterials. / Van Gough, Dara; Juhl, Abigail T.; Braun, Paul V.

In: Materials Today, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.06.2009, p. 28-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Van Gough, Dara ; Juhl, Abigail T. ; Braun, Paul V. / Programming structure into 3D nanomaterials. In: Materials Today. 2009 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 28-35.
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