Profiling of estrogen up- and down-regulated gene expression in human breast cancer cells: Insights into gene networks and pathways underlying estrogenic control of proliferation and cell phenotype

Jonna Frasor, Jeanne M. Danes, Barry Komm, Ken C.N. Chang, C. Richard Lyttle, Benita S. Katzenellenbogen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Estrogens are known to regulate the proliferation of breast cancer cells and to alter their cytoarchitectural and phenotypic properties, but the gene networks and pathways by which estrogenic hormones regulate these events are only partially understood. We used global gene expression profiling by Affymetrix GeneChip microarray analysis, with quantitative PCR verification in many cases, to identify patterns and time courses of genes that are either stimulated or inhibited by estradiol (E2) in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Of the >12,000 genes queried, over 400 showed a robust pattern of regulation, and, notably, the majority (70%) were down-regulated. We observed a general up-regulation of positive proliferation regulators, including survivin, multiple growth factors, genes involved in cell cycle progression, and regulatory factor-receptor loops, and the down-regulation of transcriptional repressors, such as Mad4 and JunB, and of antiproliferative and proapoptotic genes, including B cell translocation gene-1 and -2, cyclin G2, BCL-2 antagonist/killer 1, BCL 2-interacting killer, caspase 9, and TGFβ family growth inhibitory factors. These together likely contribute to the stimulation of proliferation and the suppression of apoptosis by E2 in these cells. Of interest, E2 appeared to modulate its own activity through the enhanced expression of genes involved in prostaglandin E production and signaling, which could lead to an increase in aromatase expression and E2 production, as well as the decreased expression of several nuclear receptor coactivators that could impact ER activity. Our studies highlight the diverse gene networks and metabolic and cell regulatory pathways through which this hormone operates to achieve its widespread effects on breast cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4562-4574
Number of pages13
JournalEndocrinology
Volume144
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

Fingerprint

Gene Regulatory Networks
Estrogens
Cell Proliferation
Breast Neoplasms
Phenotype
Gene Expression
Genes
Estrogen Receptors
Cyclin G2
Nuclear Receptor Coactivators
Hormones
Aromatase
Caspase 9
Gene Expression Profiling
Microarray Analysis
Prostaglandins E
Estradiol
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Cell Cycle
B-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Profiling of estrogen up- and down-regulated gene expression in human breast cancer cells : Insights into gene networks and pathways underlying estrogenic control of proliferation and cell phenotype. / Frasor, Jonna; Danes, Jeanne M.; Komm, Barry; Chang, Ken C.N.; Richard Lyttle, C.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 144, No. 10, 01.10.2003, p. 4562-4574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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