Processing without noticing in inattentional blindness: A replication of Moore and Egeth (1997) and Mack and Rock (1998)

Katherine Wood, Daniel J Simons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Surreptitious online measures can reveal the processing of stimuli that people do not report noticing or cannot describe. People seem to glean everything from low-level Gestalt grouping information to semantic meaning from unattended and unreported stimuli, and this information seems capable of influencing performance and of priming semantic judgments. Moore and Egeth (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 23, 339–352, 1997) provided evidence that judgments about the lengths of two lines were influenced by the grouping of background dots, even when subjects did not notice the pattern the dots formed. Mack and Rock (1998) reported that subjects could be primed to complete a stem with a word to which they were inattentionally blind. In this registered report, we replicated these two classic findings using large online samples (Ns = 260 and 448), finding support for the influence of grouping despite inattentional blindness, but not for word-stem priming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAttention, Perception, and Psychophysics
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2019

Fingerprint

blindness
Blindness
Semantics
grouping
Experimental Psychology
Dyslexia
stimulus
semantics
experimental psychology
performance
evidence
Rock
Replication
Noticing
Grouping
Inattentional Blindness
Stimulus

Keywords

  • Attention: Divided Attention and Inattention
  • attention
  • implicit/explicit memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Sensory Systems
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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