Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

To evaluate the effects of processing and genetics on resistant starch content in corn flakes, a laboratory scale corn flaking procedure was developed at a batch size of 100 g grits. Cooking (0.1 MPa/121°C, 50 min), drying (100°C, 30 min), tempering (room temperature, 30 min) and toasting (200°C, 60 s) resulted in laboratory flakes that had similar color parameters (L, a and b values) but different RVA parameters (lower peak, trough and breakdown viscosities; higher final and setback viscosities) compared to commercial corn flakes. Seven corn hybrids were flaked with the developed procedure and resistant starch contents were determined at each processing stage for each hybrid. Cooking caused the largest decrease in resistant starch content; it remained at a similar level through subsequent processing stages of drying, flaking and toasting. Differences were observed in resistant starch content among hybrids at each processing stage. Therefore, both genetic background and processing affected corn resistant starch content. Hybrids with high resistant starch content in raw flaking grits resulted in high levels of resistant starch in the final toasted flakes. Since resistant starch content is correlated with amylose content, high amylose corn hybrids could be of use in the breakfast cereal industry for manufacture of corn flakes with higher nutritional quality, provided these hybrids have high grain yields and flaking grit yields for economic feasibility to corn producers and dry millers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
PublisherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
Pages4461-4475
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781510810501
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Jul 26 2015Jul 29 2015

Publication series

NameAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
Volume6

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period7/26/157/29/15

Fingerprint

resistant starch
flakes
Starch
flaking
grits (particle size)
corn
Processing
processing stages
toasting
Amylose
Cooking
amylose
cooking
Drying
viscosity
drying
Viscosity
tempering
breakfast cereals
economic feasibility

Keywords

  • Corn flaking
  • Genetics
  • Nutrition
  • Processing
  • Resistant starch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Kandhola, G., Engeseth, N. J., Bohn, M. O., Tumbleson, M., & Rausch, K. D. (2015). Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015 (pp. 4461-4475). (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015; Vol. 6). American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.

Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes. / Kandhola, Gurshagan; Engeseth, Nicki J.; Bohn, Martin O.; Tumbleson, Mike; Rausch, Kent D.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. p. 4461-4475 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015; Vol. 6).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kandhola, G, Engeseth, NJ, Bohn, MO, Tumbleson, M & Rausch, KD 2015, Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015, vol. 6, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, pp. 4461-4475, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015, New Orleans, United States, 7/26/15.
Kandhola G, Engeseth NJ, Bohn MO, Tumbleson M, Rausch KD. Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. 2015. p. 4461-4475. (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015).
Kandhola, Gurshagan ; Engeseth, Nicki J. ; Bohn, Martin O. ; Tumbleson, Mike ; Rausch, Kent D. / Processing and genetic effects on resistant starch in corn flakes. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 2015. pp. 4461-4475 (American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2015).
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