Prioritization by transients in visual search

Artem V. Belopolsky, Jan Theeuwes, Arthur F. Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

There is an ongoing debate as to whether prioritizing new objects over old objects (the so-called preview benefit) is the result of top-down inhibition of old objects (i.e., visual marking; Watson & Humphreys, 1997) or attentional allocation to new objects, presented with a luminance transient (Donk & Theeuwes, 2001). In the two experiments reported here, we tested whether prioritization by luminance transients alone can produce a subset-selective search similar to the preview effect. Subjects viewed multiobject displays while a subset of objects was briefly flashed. The subjects prioritized up to 14 flashed objects over at least 14 nonflashed objects. Since prioritization by luminance transients can produce a subset-selective search on its own, it may well play an important role in the preview benefit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-99
Number of pages7
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2005

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Visual Search
Preview
Top-down
Experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Belopolsky, A. V., Theeuwes, J., & Kramer, A. F. (2005). Prioritization by transients in visual search. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 12(1), 93-99. https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03196352

Prioritization by transients in visual search. / Belopolsky, Artem V.; Theeuwes, Jan; Kramer, Arthur F.

In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, Vol. 12, No. 1, 02.2005, p. 93-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Belopolsky, AV, Theeuwes, J & Kramer, AF 2005, 'Prioritization by transients in visual search', Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 93-99. https://doi.org/10.3758/BF03196352
Belopolsky, Artem V. ; Theeuwes, Jan ; Kramer, Arthur F. / Prioritization by transients in visual search. In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 2005 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 93-99.
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