Principles and Procedures for Revising the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology

Miriam K. Forbes, Whitney R. Ringwald, Timothy Allen, David C. Cicero, Lee Anna Clark, Colin G. DeYoung, Nicholas Eaton, Roman Kotov, Robert F. Krueger, Robert D. Latzman, Elizabeth A. Martin, Kristin Naragon-Gainey, Camilo J. Ruggero, Irwin D. Waldman, Cassandra Brandes, Eiko I. Fried, Vina M. Goghari, Benjamin Hankin, Sarah Sperry, Kasey StantonAwais Aftab, Donald Lynam, Michael Roche, Aidan G.C. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Quantitative, empirical approaches to establishing the structure of psychopathology hold promise to improve on traditional psychiatric classification systems. The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) is a framework that summarizes the substantial and growing body of quantitative evidence on the structure of psychopathology. To achieve its aims, HiTOP must incorporate emerging research in a systematic, ongoing fashion. In this article, we describe the historical context and grounding of the principles and procedures for revising the HiTOP framework. Informed by strengths and shortcomings of previous classification systems, the proposed revisions protocol is a formalized system focused around three pillars: (a) prioritizing systematic evaluation of quantitative evidence by a set of transparent criteria and processes, (b) balancing stability with flexibility, and (c) promoting inclusion over gatekeeping in all aspects of the process.We detail how the revisions protocol will be applied in practice, including the scientific and administrative aspects of the process. Additionally,we describe areas of the HiTOP structure that will be a focus of early revisions and outline challenges for the revisions protocol moving forward. The proposed revisions protocol is designed to ensure that the HiTOP framework reflects the current state of scientific knowledge on the structure of psychopathology and fulfils its potential to advance clinical research and practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4-19
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Psychopathology and Clinical Science
Volume133
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Keywords

  • Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology
  • classification
  • nosology
  • psychiatry
  • psychopathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

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