Priming of pop-out in visual search: A comparison of young and old adults

Jason S. McCarley, Arthur F. Kramer, Angela M. Colcombe, Charles T. Scialfa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An experiment examined potential age-related differences in priming of pop-out (Maljkovic & Nakayama, 1994, 1996, 2000; McPeek, Maljkovic & Nakayama, 1999), an implicit, memory-based phenomenon that facilitates repeated gaze or attention shifts between visually similar stimuli. Older and younger adults performed a visual search task requiring them to judge the orientation of a color singleton target. Trial-to-trial repetition of target color and/or target position primed attentional selection for both age groups, producing faster and more accurate responses. Age-related increases in the strength of priming by target color appeared to arise from generalized slowing in older observers', but marginal age-related increases in the strength of priming by target position remained even after transformation to account for generalized slowing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-88
Number of pages9
JournalAging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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