Preventing early, prolonged vitamin E deficiency: An opportunity for better cognitive outcomes via early diagnosis through neonatal screening

Rebecca L. Koscik, Hui Chuan J. Lai, Anita Laxova, Kathleen M. Zaremba, Michael R. Kosorok, Jeff A. Douglas, Michael J. Rock, Mark L. Splaingard, Philip M. Farrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether early diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) through newborn screening (NBS) and early vitamin E status are associated with cognitive function. Study design: We assessed cognitive function for 71 children without meconium ileus (ages 7.3-16.9 years) enrolled in the screened (S) or control (C) group of the Wisconsin CF Neonatal Screening Project. The Test of Cognitive Skills, 2nd edition generated the cognitive skills index (CSI; mean = 100, SD = 16). Vitamin E deficiency at diagnosis was defined as plasma alpha-tocopherol (α-T) below 300 μg/dL (<300E). Primary analyses evaluated CSI scores across the 4 levels of group (S or C) by using α-T status (<300E or >300E) with analysis of covariance. Results: After adjusting for covariates, CSI in the C<300E group was significantly lower than each of the other groups (C>300E, S<300E, and S>300E; P < .05). The highest proportion of CSI scores >84 occurred in the C<300E group (41%). Patients in this group also had the lowest mean head circumference z-scores at diagnosis. Conclusions: Our results show that prolonged α-T deficiency in infancy is associated with lower subsequent cognitive performance. Thus, diagnosis via NBS may benefit the cognitive development of children with CF, particularly in those prone to vitamin E deficiency during infancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume147
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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    Koscik, R. L., Lai, H. C. J., Laxova, A., Zaremba, K. M., Kosorok, M. R., Douglas, J. A., Rock, M. J., Splaingard, M. L., & Farrell, P. M. (2005). Preventing early, prolonged vitamin E deficiency: An opportunity for better cognitive outcomes via early diagnosis through neonatal screening. Journal of Pediatrics, 147(3 SUPPL.). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2005.08.003