Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from dogs and cats in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory in Colombia from 2016–2019

David A. Gómez-Beltrán, David Villar, Sara López-Osorio, Duncan Ferguson, Laura K. Monsalve, Jenny J. Chaparro-Gutiérrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The susceptibility to antimicrobials of bacterial isolates from dogs (n = 1256) and cats (n = 94) was retrospectively evaluated in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory over a 4-year period (2016–2019). Out of 1316 isolates in dogs, 771 were Staphylococcus spp. distributed as follows: Staph. pseudointermedius (n = 406), Staph. intermedius (n = 160), Staph. aureus (n = 104), and Staph. coagulase-negative (n = 101). In common, all Staphylococcus spp. showed a high prevalence (20–50%) of resistance to ampicillin, cephalosporin, enrofloxacin, gentamicin, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfonamide, but a low prevalence (1–10%) of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate. With regards to the other families of bacteria, the number of antimicrobials for which resistance was high (>20%) in dogs was: Enterobacteriaceae (7/12), Enterococcus spp. (10/16), E. coli (11/15), Pseudomonas spp. (10/13), and Streptococcus spp. (4/9). For urinary tract infections caused by E. coli or Enterobacteriaceae (Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp.), amikacin and florfenicol were the only drugs that demonstrated 100% in vitro efficacy. Multi-drug resistance was observed in 18.7% (246/1316) and 22% (21/97) of the isolates from dogs and cats, respectively. Except for Pseudomonas spp., known for intrinsic resistance, resistance in other bacteria was likely attributed to high selection pressure. In conclusion, empirical antimicrobial use cannot be recommended to treat most common infections, and selection should be based on results from susceptibility testing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number173
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalVeterinary Sciences
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Cats
  • Colombia
  • Dogs
  • Multidrug resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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