Prevalence of antenatal suicidal ideation among racially and ethnically diverse WIC enrolled women receiving care in a Midwestern public health clinic

Karen M. Tabb, Amelia R. Gavin, Alexandre Faisal-Cury, Nichole Nidey, Ya Fen Chan, Tumani Malinga, Brandon Meline, Hsiang Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Suicidal ideation (SI) during pregnancy is a major maternal health concern, however few examinations report findings on the burden of SI among low-income women. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation among a sample of low-income women. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of 736 low-income pregnant women enrolled in a Women Infant and Children supplemental nutrition program and a perinatal depression registry between 2013 and 2015. All participants provided informed consent. SI was captured from Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) screens administered during standard clinic visits. Results: The prevalence of suicidal ideation was 4.6%. After adjusting for smoking, women with depression were 13 times as likely to report SI. Limitations: SI was measured using a single item from the EPDS during pregnancy. Conclusions: This study indicates that most, but not all, women with SI reported elevated depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-281
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume256
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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