Prevalence and Correlates of Tobacco Smoking During the Perinatal Period Among Women Enrolled in a Midwestern WIC Program

Karen M. Tabb, Tumani Malinga, Yang Wang, Kelsie Kelly, Brandon Meline, Hsiang Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Perinatal tobacco smoking remains a public health concern and is associated with smoking related morbidity and mortality. This study aims to report the prevalence and correlates of smoking during pregnancy among low-income women. Methods: The study sample comprised 729 pregnant women who were enrolled in a perinatal depression registry in a public health WIC program between 2013 and 2015. Smoking risks were obtained from the clinical USDA Risk Assessment. STATA 14.2 was used for analyses. Results: 15.1% of women reported smoking during pregnancy. Compared to White women, Black women were less likely to smoke odds ratio (OR 0.45 [95% CI 0.25–0.81]). Foreign-born women and women living in non-smoking homes remained at a lower risk for smoking during pregnancy. Implications: Smoking during pregnancy is prevalent among low-income women. In addition to prenatal education on smoking cessation, supportive measures to help deliver smoking cessation interventions should be provided to household members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)771-775
Number of pages5
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Low-income
  • Maternal smoking
  • Perinatal
  • Pregnancy
  • WIC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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