Pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with the presence of nutrition impact symptoms 1 year after diagnosis in patients with head and neck cancer

Sylvia L. Crowder, Kalika P. Sarma, Alison M. Mondul, Yi Tang Chen, Zonggui Li, Marta Yanina Pepino de Gruev, Katie R. Zarins, Gregory T. Wolf, Laura S. Rozek, Anna Arthur Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Dietary inflammatory potential could impact the presence and severity of chronic adverse treatment effects among patients with head and neck cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with nutrition impact symptoms (NIS) as self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Methods: This was a longitudinal study of 336 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer enrolled in the University of Michigan Head and Neck Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Principal component analysis was utilized to derive pretreatment dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data. Burden of seven NIS was self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Associations between pretreatment dietary patterns and individual symptoms and a composite NIS summary score were examined with multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The two dietary patterns that emerged were prudent and Western. After adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, tumor site, cancer stage, calories, and human papillomavirus status, significant inverse associations were observed between the prudent pattern and difficulty chewing [OR 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21–0.93; P ¼ 0.03], dysphagia of liquids (OR 0.38; 95% CI, 0.18–0.79; P ¼ 0.009), dysphagia of solid foods (OR 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), mucositis (OR 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), and the NIS summary score (OR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22–0.94; P ¼ 0.03). No significant associations were observed between the Western pattern and NIS. Conclusions: Consumption of a prudent diet before treatment may help reduce the risk of chronic NIS burden among head and neck cancer survivors. Impact: Dietary interventions are needed to test whether consumption of a prudent dietary pattern before and during head and neck cancer treatment results in reduced NIS burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1652-1659
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume28
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Head and Neck Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Deglutition Disorders
Logistic Models
Food
Mucositis
Mastication
Principal Component Analysis
Longitudinal Studies
Survivors
Neoplasms
Body Mass Index
Neck
Therapeutics
Smoking
Head
Diet
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with the presence of nutrition impact symptoms 1 year after diagnosis in patients with head and neck cancer. / Crowder, Sylvia L.; Sarma, Kalika P.; Mondul, Alison M.; Chen, Yi Tang; Li, Zonggui; Pepino de Gruev, Marta Yanina; Zarins, Katie R.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Rozek, Laura S.; Parker, Anna Arthur.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 28, No. 10, 01.01.2019, p. 1652-1659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crowder, Sylvia L. ; Sarma, Kalika P. ; Mondul, Alison M. ; Chen, Yi Tang ; Li, Zonggui ; Pepino de Gruev, Marta Yanina ; Zarins, Katie R. ; Wolf, Gregory T. ; Rozek, Laura S. ; Parker, Anna Arthur. / Pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with the presence of nutrition impact symptoms 1 year after diagnosis in patients with head and neck cancer. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 10. pp. 1652-1659.
@article{e804f7680f9b4a9a9dba166953468c15,
title = "Pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with the presence of nutrition impact symptoms 1 year after diagnosis in patients with head and neck cancer",
abstract = "Background: Dietary inflammatory potential could impact the presence and severity of chronic adverse treatment effects among patients with head and neck cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with nutrition impact symptoms (NIS) as self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Methods: This was a longitudinal study of 336 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer enrolled in the University of Michigan Head and Neck Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Principal component analysis was utilized to derive pretreatment dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data. Burden of seven NIS was self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Associations between pretreatment dietary patterns and individual symptoms and a composite NIS summary score were examined with multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The two dietary patterns that emerged were prudent and Western. After adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, tumor site, cancer stage, calories, and human papillomavirus status, significant inverse associations were observed between the prudent pattern and difficulty chewing [OR 0.44; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.21–0.93; P ¼ 0.03], dysphagia of liquids (OR 0.38; 95{\%} CI, 0.18–0.79; P ¼ 0.009), dysphagia of solid foods (OR 0.46; 95{\%} CI, 0.22–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), mucositis (OR 0.48; 95{\%} CI, 0.24–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), and the NIS summary score (OR 0.45; 95{\%} CI, 0.22–0.94; P ¼ 0.03). No significant associations were observed between the Western pattern and NIS. Conclusions: Consumption of a prudent diet before treatment may help reduce the risk of chronic NIS burden among head and neck cancer survivors. Impact: Dietary interventions are needed to test whether consumption of a prudent dietary pattern before and during head and neck cancer treatment results in reduced NIS burden.",
author = "Crowder, {Sylvia L.} and Sarma, {Kalika P.} and Mondul, {Alison M.} and Chen, {Yi Tang} and Zonggui Li and {Pepino de Gruev}, {Marta Yanina} and Zarins, {Katie R.} and Wolf, {Gregory T.} and Rozek, {Laura S.} and Parker, {Anna Arthur}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0128",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "1652--1659",
journal = "Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention",
issn = "1055-9965",
publisher = "American Association for Cancer Research Inc.",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with the presence of nutrition impact symptoms 1 year after diagnosis in patients with head and neck cancer

AU - Crowder, Sylvia L.

AU - Sarma, Kalika P.

AU - Mondul, Alison M.

AU - Chen, Yi Tang

AU - Li, Zonggui

AU - Pepino de Gruev, Marta Yanina

AU - Zarins, Katie R.

AU - Wolf, Gregory T.

AU - Rozek, Laura S.

AU - Parker, Anna Arthur

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Dietary inflammatory potential could impact the presence and severity of chronic adverse treatment effects among patients with head and neck cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with nutrition impact symptoms (NIS) as self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Methods: This was a longitudinal study of 336 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer enrolled in the University of Michigan Head and Neck Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Principal component analysis was utilized to derive pretreatment dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data. Burden of seven NIS was self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Associations between pretreatment dietary patterns and individual symptoms and a composite NIS summary score were examined with multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The two dietary patterns that emerged were prudent and Western. After adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, tumor site, cancer stage, calories, and human papillomavirus status, significant inverse associations were observed between the prudent pattern and difficulty chewing [OR 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21–0.93; P ¼ 0.03], dysphagia of liquids (OR 0.38; 95% CI, 0.18–0.79; P ¼ 0.009), dysphagia of solid foods (OR 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), mucositis (OR 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), and the NIS summary score (OR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22–0.94; P ¼ 0.03). No significant associations were observed between the Western pattern and NIS. Conclusions: Consumption of a prudent diet before treatment may help reduce the risk of chronic NIS burden among head and neck cancer survivors. Impact: Dietary interventions are needed to test whether consumption of a prudent dietary pattern before and during head and neck cancer treatment results in reduced NIS burden.

AB - Background: Dietary inflammatory potential could impact the presence and severity of chronic adverse treatment effects among patients with head and neck cancer. The objective of this study was to determine whether pretreatment dietary patterns are associated with nutrition impact symptoms (NIS) as self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Methods: This was a longitudinal study of 336 patients with newly diagnosed head and neck cancer enrolled in the University of Michigan Head and Neck Specialized Program of Research Excellence. Principal component analysis was utilized to derive pretreatment dietary patterns from food frequency questionnaire data. Burden of seven NIS was self-reported 1 year after diagnosis. Associations between pretreatment dietary patterns and individual symptoms and a composite NIS summary score were examined with multivariable logistic regression models. Results: The two dietary patterns that emerged were prudent and Western. After adjusting for age, smoking status, body mass index, tumor site, cancer stage, calories, and human papillomavirus status, significant inverse associations were observed between the prudent pattern and difficulty chewing [OR 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.21–0.93; P ¼ 0.03], dysphagia of liquids (OR 0.38; 95% CI, 0.18–0.79; P ¼ 0.009), dysphagia of solid foods (OR 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), mucositis (OR 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24–0.96; P ¼ 0.03), and the NIS summary score (OR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.22–0.94; P ¼ 0.03). No significant associations were observed between the Western pattern and NIS. Conclusions: Consumption of a prudent diet before treatment may help reduce the risk of chronic NIS burden among head and neck cancer survivors. Impact: Dietary interventions are needed to test whether consumption of a prudent dietary pattern before and during head and neck cancer treatment results in reduced NIS burden.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85072849172&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85072849172&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0128

DO - 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-19-0128

M3 - Article

C2 - 31315911

AN - SCOPUS:85072849172

VL - 28

SP - 1652

EP - 1659

JO - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

JF - Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention

SN - 1055-9965

IS - 10

ER -