Pressure measurements on the impingement surface of sonic and sub-sonic jets impinging onto a flat plate at inclined angles

Jim Crafton, Campbell Carter, John Sullivan, Greg Elliott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The flow field associated with a jet impinging onto a surface at an inclined angle is investigated using pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) and particle image velocimetry. The PSP yields continuous measurements of pressure on the jet impingement surface. The jet footprint on the impingement surface is visualized using the half-maximum pressure contour. The results indicate that the impingement angle of the jet is the dominant parameter in determining the footprint of the jet on the impingement surface. This contour is similar in shape to an ellipse that is created by projecting the nozzle through the impingement surface. The ellipse is centered at the location of maximum pressure and the width of the minor axis is just over one jet diameter. The location of maximum pressure is found upstream of the geometric impingement point and this location is a strong function of the impingement angle. A curve fit for the location of maximum pressure can be constructed using an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for a non-orthogonal stagnation flow. The maximum value of pressure is a function of impingement angle and varies as the sine of the impingement angle squared; the maximum pressure is also a function of jet impingement distance. Using these results, a simple procedure for predicting the overall structure of the jet on the impingement surface is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)697-707
Number of pages11
JournalExperiments in Fluids
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Keywords

  • Inclined impinging jet
  • Particle image velocimetry
  • Pressure-sensitive paint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

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