Prehistoric Dog Pathology in the American Bottom: Reanalysis of the Range Site (11S47) Canid Assemblage, St. Clair County, Illinois

Allison L. Huber

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

For thousands of years, domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have sustained a unique and complex relationship with humans, figuring prominently in both spiritual and prosaic realms of Native American society. Archaeological investigations at the late prehistoric Range site (11S47) in the American Bottom region of Illinois resulted in the recovery of over 3,500 dog remains, representing 52 individuals. This well-preserved faunal assemblage allows for a detailed study that provides important insight on the daily lives of Native American dogs during the Late Woodland Patrick phase (A.D. 650-900) and Terminal Late Woodland period (A.D. 900-1050). My reanalysis of this collection focuses on the documentation and interpretation of prehistoric pathology and trauma. This paper serves as a preliminary summary of the paleo-pathology observed on the Range dog remains, makes comparisons with contemporaneous canid assemblages in the region, and highlights patterns observed that will guide future research.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgram and Abstracts - 61st Annual Meeting
Pages97
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • ISAS

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prehistoric Dog Pathology in the American Bottom: Reanalysis of the Range Site (11S47) Canid Assemblage, St. Clair County, Illinois'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this