Predicting Intelligibility Deficit in Dysphonic Speech with Cepstral Peak Prominence

Keiko Ishikawa, Alessandro de Alarcon, Sid Khosla, Lisa Kelchner, Noah Silbert, Suzanne Boyce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the potential of cepstral peak prominence (CPP) for predicting the intelligibility deficit in dysphonic speech. Methods: Sentences from Hearing-in-Noise Test were recorded from 18 speakers with dysphonia and 18 speakers with normal voice. These samples were presented to 60 adults with normal hearing in quiet and noise at signal to noise ratio of +0 dB. Intelligibility was measured by orthographic transcription. Cepstral peak prominence was measured for all samples. Correlation between CPP and intelligibility score was examined. Results: Intelligibility was significantly lower in dysphonic speech than normal speech in the presence of background noise. The correlation between CPP and intelligibility score was moderate when the intelligibility scores were averaged per speaker. Conclusions: Cepstral peak prominence only moderately predicts intelligibility deficit in dysphonic speech. Accordingly, CPP alone is not sufficient for describing the deficit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-78
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume127
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Keywords

  • acoustic analysis
  • background noise
  • cepstral peak prominence
  • dysphonia
  • intelligibility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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