Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP

M. E. Edwards, P. M. Anderson, L. B. Brubaker, T. A. Ager, A. A. Andreev, N. H. Bigelow, L. C. Cwynar, W. R. Eisner, S. P. Harrison, F. S. Hu, D. Jolly, A. V. Lozhkin, G. M. MacDonald, C. J. Mock, J. C. Ritchie, A. V. Sher, R. W. Spear, J. W. Williams, G. Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The objective biomization method developed by Prentice et al. (1996) for Europe was extended using modern pollen samples from Beringia and then applied to fossil pollen data to reconstruct palaeovegetation patterns at 6000 and 18,000 14C yr BP. The predicted modern distribution of tundra, taiga and cool conifer forests in Alaska and north-western Canada generally corresponds well to actual vegetation patterns, although sites in regions characterized today by a mosaic of forest and tundra vegetation tend to be preferentially assigned to tundra. Siberian larch forests are delimited less well, probably due to the extreme under-representation of Larix in pollen spectra. The biome distribution across Beringia at 6000 14C yr BP was broadly similar to today, with little change in the northern forest limit, except for a possible northward-advance in the Mackenzie delta region. The western forest limit in Alaska was probably east of its modern position. At 18,000 14C yr BP the whole of Beringia was covered by tundra. However, the importance of the various plant functional types varied from site to site, supporting the idea that the vegetation cover was a mosaic of different tundra types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)521-554
Number of pages34
JournalJournal of Biogeography
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

Fingerprint

Beringia
tundra
biome
pollen
ecosystems
Larix sibirica
Larix
taiga
vegetation
vegetation cover
boreal forest
coniferous forests
coniferous tree
fossils
Canada
fossil

Keywords

  • Alaska
  • Biomes
  • Climate changes
  • Eastern Siberia
  • Last glacial maximum
  • Mid-Holocene
  • Plant functional types
  • Pollen data
  • Vegetation changes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Cite this

Edwards, M. E., Anderson, P. M., Brubaker, L. B., Ager, T. A., Andreev, A. A., Bigelow, N. H., ... Yu, G. (2000). Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP. Journal of Biogeography, 27(3), 521-554. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2699.2000.00426.x

Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP. / Edwards, M. E.; Anderson, P. M.; Brubaker, L. B.; Ager, T. A.; Andreev, A. A.; Bigelow, N. H.; Cwynar, L. C.; Eisner, W. R.; Harrison, S. P.; Hu, F. S.; Jolly, D.; Lozhkin, A. V.; MacDonald, G. M.; Mock, C. J.; Ritchie, J. C.; Sher, A. V.; Spear, R. W.; Williams, J. W.; Yu, G.

In: Journal of Biogeography, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.12.2000, p. 521-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Edwards, ME, Anderson, PM, Brubaker, LB, Ager, TA, Andreev, AA, Bigelow, NH, Cwynar, LC, Eisner, WR, Harrison, SP, Hu, FS, Jolly, D, Lozhkin, AV, MacDonald, GM, Mock, CJ, Ritchie, JC, Sher, AV, Spear, RW, Williams, JW & Yu, G 2000, 'Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP', Journal of Biogeography, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 521-554. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2699.2000.00426.x
Edwards ME, Anderson PM, Brubaker LB, Ager TA, Andreev AA, Bigelow NH et al. Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP. Journal of Biogeography. 2000 Dec 1;27(3):521-554. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2699.2000.00426.x
Edwards, M. E. ; Anderson, P. M. ; Brubaker, L. B. ; Ager, T. A. ; Andreev, A. A. ; Bigelow, N. H. ; Cwynar, L. C. ; Eisner, W. R. ; Harrison, S. P. ; Hu, F. S. ; Jolly, D. ; Lozhkin, A. V. ; MacDonald, G. M. ; Mock, C. J. ; Ritchie, J. C. ; Sher, A. V. ; Spear, R. W. ; Williams, J. W. ; Yu, G. / Pollen-based biomes for Beringia 18,000, 6000 and 0 14C yr BP. In: Journal of Biogeography. 2000 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 521-554.
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