Planning Smart(er) Cities: The Promise of Civic Technology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Civic technology is an emerging field that typically leverages open data—and sometimes open source software—to address challenges that may be invisible to or neglected by government in a collaborative, problem-centered way. This article describes the goals and values of civic technology, identifies its raw materials and products, and outlines its most visible modalities. We use key informant interviews with stakeholders in Chicago’s robust civic technology ecosystem and a brief discussion of the Array of Things (AoT) project to evaluate claims that civic technology can be an effective mechanism for democratizing the Smart City. We conclude with recommendations for urban planners interested in engaging with civic technology to enhance quality of life and further social equity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-23
JournalJournal of Urban Technology
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Jul 3 2019

Fingerprint

planning
urban planner
quality of life
raw materials
equity
stakeholder
smart city
ecosystem
interview
Values

Keywords

  • civic hacking
  • Civic technology
  • Smart Cities
  • urban planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Planning Smart(er) Cities : The Promise of Civic Technology. / Wilson, Beverly K; Chakraborty, Arnab.

In: Journal of Urban Technology, 03.07.2019, p. 1-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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