Placentome nutrient transporters and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling proteins are altered by the methionine supply during late gestation in dairy cows and are associated with newborn birth weight

Fernanda Batistel, Abdulrahman S.M. Alharthi, Ling Wang, Claudia Parys, Yuan Xiang Pan, Felipe C. Cardoso, Juan J. Loor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To our knowledge, most research demonstrating a link between maternal nutrition and both fetal growth and offspring development after birth has been performed with nonruminants. Whether such relationships exist in large ruminants is largely unknown. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether increasing the methionine supply during late pregnancywould alter uteroplacental tissue nutrient transporters and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and their relation with newborn body weight. Methods: Multiparous Holstein cows were used in a randomized complete block design experiment. During the last 28 d of pregnancy, cows were fed a control diet or the control diet plus ethylcellulose rumen-protected methionine (0.9 g/kg dry matter intake) (Mepron; Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH) to achieve a 2.8:1 ratio of lysine to methionine in the metabolizable protein reaching the small intestine. We collected placentome samples at parturition and used them to assess mRNA and protein expression and the phosphorylation status of mTOR pathway proteins. Results: Newborn body weight was greater in the methionine group than in the control group (44.1 kg and 41.8 kg, respectively; P ≤ 0.05). Increasing themethionine supply also resulted in greater feed intake (15.8 kg/d and 14.6 kg/d), plasma methionine (11.9 μ Mand 15.3 μM), and plasma insulin (1.16 μg/L and 0.81 μg/L) in cows during late pregnancy. As a result, mRNA expression of genes involved in neutral amino acid transport [solute carrier (SLC) family members SLC3A2, SLC7A5, SLC38A1, and SLC38A10], glucose transport [SLC2A1, SLC2A3, and SLC2A4], and the mTOR pathway [mechanistic target of rapamycin and ribosomal protein S6 kinase B1] were upregulated (P ≤ 0.07) inmethionine-supplemented cows. Among 6 proteins in the mTOR pathway, increasing the methionine supply led to greater (P ≤ 0.09) protein expression of a serinethreonine kinase (AKT), phosphorylated (p)-AKT, p-eukaryotic elongation factor 2, and the p-mTOR:mTOR ratio. Conclusion: Supplemental methionine during late gestation increases feed intake and newborn body weight in dairy cows, and this effect may be mediated by alterations in the uteroplacental transport of nondispensable and dispensable amino acids and glucose at least in part through changes in gene transcription andmTOR signaling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1640-1647
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume147
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Dairy cow
  • MTOR
  • Metabolism
  • Placentome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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