Phytochemical changes in phenolics, anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, and carotenoids associated with sweetpotato storage and impacts on bioactive properties

Mary H. Grace, Gad G. Yousef, Sally J. Gustafson, Van Den Truong, G. Craig Yencho, Mary Ann Lila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sweetpotato phytochemical content was evaluated in four genotypes (NCPUR06-020, Covington, Yellow Covington, and NC07-847) at harvest and after curing/storage for 4 or 8 months. Curing and storage for up to 8 months did not significantly affect total phenolic content in Covington, Yellow Covington, and NC07-847, however for NCPUR06-020, a purple-fleshed selection, total phenolic content declined mainly due to anthocyanin degradation during storage. Covington had the highest carotenoid content at harvest time (281.9 μg/g DM), followed by NC07-847 (26.2 μg/g DM), and after 8 months, total carotenoids had increased by 25% and 50%, respectively. Antioxidant activity gradually declined during storage, and freshly harvested sweetpotatoes also demonstrated higher anti-inflammatory capacity as gauged by inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y cells. Gradual changes in sweetpotato phytochemical content and antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity were noted during normal long-term storage, but the specific effects were genotype-dependent.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)717-724
Number of pages8
JournalFood chemistry
Volume145
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antioxidant activity
  • Carotenoids
  • Phenolics
  • Postharvest
  • Storage
  • Sweetpotato

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Food Science

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