Physiological and fitness consequences of embryonic rearing environment among populations of post-metamorphic wood frogs, Lithobates sylvatica

T. C. Clay, William E. Peterman, M. E. Gifford

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Early ontogenetic stages can have lasting effects on future stages. Itis important to quantify the magnitude and nature of carry−overeffects within a species before making broad generalizations amongspecies. We examined how experimental pond drying affectedpost−metamorphic morphology, physiology, and performance inwood frogs, Lithobates sylvatica. In addition, we tested ifpopulations differed in their response to pond drying. Initial mass,limb−length, snout−vent length, and resting metabolic rate weremeasured on newly metamorphed frogs. Juveniles were then rearedwith ad−libitum food for 7 weeks to measure growth rate. Larvaltreatment induced differences in limb length with individuals in thedrying treatment having longer limbs upon completion ofmetamorphosis. Postmetamorphic frogs differed by population ininitial mass, snout−vent length, jumping performance, swimmingperformance, resting metabolic rate, and growth rate. Our studysuggests that population, and not larval conditions, has a greaterinfluence on the post−metamorphic phenotype and performance.Furthermore, despite population level differences, our study suggeststhat populations respond similarly to larval rearing conditions
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIntegrative and Comparative Biology
PagesE31
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • INHS

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