Physical studies of cell surface and cell membrane structure. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of deuterium-labelled N-hexadecanoylgalactosylceramides (Cerebrosides)

Robert Skarjune, Eric Oldfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

1. 1. Deuterium Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of a series of N-palmitoylgalactosylceramides (cerebrosides) specifically labelled with deuterium at one of positions 2′, 6′, 10′ and 16′ of the acyl chain, or in the C-6 hydroxymethyl group of the galactose residue, have been obtained using a spin-echo technique at 34.1 MHz with a homebuilt superconducting magnet spectrometer. 2. 2. The effects of temperature and cholesterol on the deuterium spectra have been investigated. The results indicate, when compared at the same reduced temperature, that the hydrocarbon chain organization in the liquid crystalline phase of palmitoylgalactosylceramide is essentially identical to that seen in similar chain length glycerophospholipids. In particular, two sets of quadrupole splittings are seen for a 2′-labelled N-palmitoylgalactosylceramide, indicating non-equivalent deuterons as noted previously for phospholipids. 3. 3. Two sets of quadrupole splittings are observed for the headgroup C-6-labelled N-palmitoylgalactosylceramide. It is proposed that these signals arise from the enantiomeric R and S lipids, and that motion of the hydroxymethyl group is slow (greater than 10-5 s). These results suggest the presence of a hydrogen bond network in the polar headgroup region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)208-218
Number of pages11
JournalBBA - Biomembranes
Volume556
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 1979

Keywords

  • Cerebroside
  • Cholesterol
  • Glycolipid
  • H-NMR
  • Membrane structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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