Physical fitness and chronic low back pain. An analysis of the relationships among fitness, functional limitations, and depression

K. J. McQuade, J. A. Turner, D. M. Buchner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe the associations between physical fitness and important aspects of chronic low back pain problems, specifically, pain, depression, physical dysfunction, and psychologic dysfunction. Ninety-six persons with chronic low back pain were evaluated with a battery of physical and psychologic disability measures and basic physical fitness tests for aerobic capacity, strength and flexibility. Greater overall physical fitness was significantly correlated with less physical dysfunction (R = -0.48) and fewer depressive symptoms (multiple R = -0.42), but not with psychologic dysfunction (R = -0.20) or pain (R = -0.20). Fitness accounted for 23% of the variance in physical dysfunction and 17% of the variance in depression in this mildly dysfunctional chronic back pain patient sample. Strength, as compared with aerobic capacity or flexibility, was the fitness variance contributing most to these observed associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-204
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number233
StatePublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Physical fitness and chronic low back pain. An analysis of the relationships among fitness, functional limitations, and depression'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this