Physical activity, self-esteem, and self-efficacy relationships in older adults: A randomized controlled trial

Edward McAuley, Bryan Blissmer, Jeffrey Katula, Terry E. Duncan, Shannon L. Mihalko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A randomized controlled trial examined the growth and form of multidimensional self-esteem over a 12-month period (6-month exercise intervention and 6-month follow-up) in 174 older adults engaged in either a walking or stretching/toning program. The extent to which changes in physical fitness parameters and physical self-efficacy were related to changes in perceptions of attractive body, strength, physical conditioning, and physical self-worth was also determined. Latent growth curve analyses showed a curvilinear pattern of growth in esteem with significant increases at all levels of self-esteem upon completion of the intervention followed by significant declines at 6-months postintervention in both groups. Frequency of activity and changes in physical fitness, body fat and self-efficacy were related to improvements in esteem perceptions relative to attractive body, strength, and physical condition. Model fitting procedures suggested that the best fit of the data was to a model in which the influence of changes in efficacy and physical parameters on physical self-worth were mediated by perceptions of attractive body and physical condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-139
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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