Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and physical function in older adults with multiple sclerosis

Katie L. Cederberg, Robert W. Motl, Edward McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Older adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience the combined effects of aging and a chronic, disabling neurological disease on physical activity, sedentary behavior, and physical function. This study examined associations among light and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (LPA and MVPA), sedentary behavior, and physical function in older adults with MS. Forty older adults with MS (median age = 60 years) who had a median Expanded Disability Status Scale score of 4.5 wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and completed the Short Physical Performance Battery (SBBP), 6-minute walk (6MW), and timed 25-foot walk (T25FW). LPA was associated with SPPB (rs = .551, p < 0.01), 6MW (rs = .660, p < 0.01), and T25FW (rs = .623, p < 0.01) scores; MVPA was associated with 6MW (rs = .529, p < 0.01) and T25FW (rs = .403, p < 0.01) scores. There were significant associations between LPA, but not MVPA, with SPPB (β = .583, p < 0.01), 6MW (β = .613, p < 0.01), and T25FW (β = .627, p < 0.01) scores in linear regression analyses. Older adults with MS who engaged in more LPA demonstrated better physical function and therefore LPA might be a target of future behavioral interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-182
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Aging and Physical Activity
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Accelerometry
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Older adults
  • Physical activity
  • Physical function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and physical function in older adults with multiple sclerosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this