Physical activity is linked to greater moment-to-moment variability in spontaneous brain activity in older adults

Agnieszka Z. Burzynska, Chelsea N. Wong, Michelle W. Voss, Gillian E. Cooke, Neha P. Gothe, Jason Fanning, Edward McAuley, Arthur F Kramer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Higher cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA) in old age are associated with greater brain structural and functional integrity, and higher cognitive functioning. However, it is not known how different aspects of lifestyle such as sedentariness, light PA (LIPA), or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MV-PA) relate to neural activity in aging. In addition, it is not known whether the effects of PA on brain function differ or overlap with those of CRF. Here, we objectively measured CRF as oxygen consumption during a maximal exercise test and measured PA with an accelerometer worn for 7 days in 100 healthy but low active older adults (aged 60-80 years). We modeled the relationships between CRF, PA, and brain functional integrity using multivariate partial least squares analysis. As an index of functional brain integrity we used spontaneous moment-to-moment variability in the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal (SDBOLD), known to be associated with better cognitive functioning in aging.We found that older adults who engaged more in LI-PA and MV-PA had greater SDBOLD in brain regions that play a role in integrating segregated functional domains in the brain and benefit from greater CRF or PA, such as precuneus, hippocampus, medial and lateral prefrontal, and temporal cortices. Our results suggest that engaging in higher intensity PA may have protective effects on neural processing in aging. Finally, we demonstrated that older adults with greater overall WM microstructure were those showing more LI-PA and MV-PA and greater SDBOLD.We conclude that SDBOLD is a promising correlate of functional brain health in aging. Future analyses will evaluate whether SDBOLD is modifiable with interventions aimed to increase PA and CRF in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0134819
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2015

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physical activity
Brain
brain
Aging of materials
Parietal Lobe
Physical Fitness
Oxygenation
Temporal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Least-Squares Analysis
Exercise Test
Accelerometers
Oxygen Consumption
Cardiorespiratory Fitness
Life Style
Hippocampus
Blood
Health
Oxygen
exercise test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Burzynska, A. Z., Wong, C. N., Voss, M. W., Cooke, G. E., Gothe, N. P., Fanning, J., ... Kramer, A. F. (2015). Physical activity is linked to greater moment-to-moment variability in spontaneous brain activity in older adults. PloS one, 10(8), [e0134819]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0134819

Physical activity is linked to greater moment-to-moment variability in spontaneous brain activity in older adults. / Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.; Wong, Chelsea N.; Voss, Michelle W.; Cooke, Gillian E.; Gothe, Neha P.; Fanning, Jason; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 8, e0134819, 05.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burzynska, Agnieszka Z. ; Wong, Chelsea N. ; Voss, Michelle W. ; Cooke, Gillian E. ; Gothe, Neha P. ; Fanning, Jason ; McAuley, Edward ; Kramer, Arthur F. / Physical activity is linked to greater moment-to-moment variability in spontaneous brain activity in older adults. In: PloS one. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 8.
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