Persuasion and Culture: Advertising Appeals in Individualistic and Collectivistic Societies

Sang pil Han, Sharon Shavitt

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Two studies examined the extent to which a core dimension of cultural variability, individualism-collectivism (Hofstede, 1980, 1983; Triandis, 1990), is reflected in the types of persuasive appeals that tend to be used and that tend to be effective in different countries. Study 1 demonstrated that magazine advertisements in the United States, an individualistic culture, employed appeals to individual benefits and preferences, personal success, and independence to a greater extent than did advertisements in Korea, a collectivistic culture. Korean advertisements employed appeals emphasizing ingroup benefits, harmony, and family integrity to a greater extent than did U.S. ads. Study 2, a controlled experiment conducted in the two countries, demonstrated that in the U.S. advertisements emphasizing individualistic benefits were more persuasive, and ads emphasizing family or ingroup benefits were less persuasive than they were in Korea. In both studies, however, product characteristics played a role in moderating these overall differences: Cultural differences emerged strongly in Studies 1 and 2 for advertised products that tend to be purchased and used with others, but were much less evident for products that are typically purchased and used individually.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages326-350
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1994

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Persuasive Communication
Korea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Persuasion and Culture : Advertising Appeals in Individualistic and Collectivistic Societies. / Han, Sang pil; Shavitt, Sharon.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 4, 07.1994, p. 326-350.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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