Personality predispositions in Chinese adolescents: The relation between self-criticism, dependency, and prospective internalizing symptoms

Joseph R. Cohen, Jami F. Young, Benjamin L. Hankin, Shuqiao Yao, Xiong Zhao Zhu, John R.Z. Abela

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study examined the prospective relation between two personality predispositions, self-criticism and dependency, and internalizing symptoms. Specifically, it was examined whether self-criticism and dependency predicted symptoms of depression and social anxiety, and if a moderation (e.g. diathesis-stress) or mediation model best explained the relation between the personality predispositions and emotional distress in Chinese adolescents. Participants included 1,150 adolescents (597 females and 553 males) from mainland China. Participants completed self-report measures of self-criticism, dependency, and neuroticism at baseline, and self-report measures of negative events, depressive symptoms, and social anxiety symptoms once a month for six months. Findings showed that self-criticism predicted depressive symptoms, while dependency predicted social anxiety symptoms. In addition, support was found for a mediation model, as op posed to a moderation model, with achievement stressors mediating the relation between self-criticism and depressive symptoms. Overall, these findings highlight new developmental pathways for the development of depression and social anxiety symptoms in mainland Chinese adolescents. Implications for cross-cultural developmental psychopathology research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)596-618
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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