Personal well-being across the transition to marriage equality: A longitudinal analysis

Brian Gabriel Ogolsky, J. Kale Monk, Te Kisha M. Rice, Ramona Faith Oswald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined the ways that federal, state, and local marriage recognition influence multiple domains of personal well-being of individuals in same-sex (n = 279) and different-sex (n = 266) relationships. Longitudinal data were collected across the transition to marriage equality (i.e., the U.S. Supreme Court Obergefell v. Hodges [2015] case decision, which resulted in same-sex marriage recognition federally). Prior to the ruling, levels of stigma and psychological distress were higher and family support was lower for individuals who were in same-sex (vs. different-sex) relationships. Levels of life satisfaction and family support were higher for those who were married (vs. not married). Levels of stigma and stress were lower and family support and life satisfaction were higher for those who lived in states that recognized same-sex marriage. A more supportive community climate was also associated with lower levels of stigma and stress and higher levels of family support than less supportive communities. Following the ruling, levels of stigma decreased over time, particularly for individuals in same-sex relationships, after accounting for state and local recognition. Levels of family support also increased, whereas support from friends decreased following the ruling. The findings of this study indicate that federal, state, and local marriage recognition play unique roles in changing the climate of discrimination for individuals in same-sex relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)422-432
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

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Marriage
Climate
Psychology

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Distress
  • Family policy
  • Same-sex marriage
  • Well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Personal well-being across the transition to marriage equality : A longitudinal analysis. / Ogolsky, Brian Gabriel; Kale Monk, J.; Rice, Te Kisha M.; Oswald, Ramona Faith.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 06.2019, p. 422-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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