Perinatal depression screening in a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program: Perception of feasibility and acceptability among a multidisciplinary staff

Karen M. Tabb, Shinwoo Choi, Maria Pineros-Leano, Brandon Meline, Hellen G. McDonald, Rachel Kester, Hsiang Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Best practices for addressing women's mental health and screening for depression in public health clinics are not available. Clinic staff are often responsible for screening for depression; however, few studies examine staff perceptions on feasibility and acceptability of using perinatal screening for mood disorders in ethnically diverse public health clinics. Methods: During December 2012, we conducted four focus groups using a semistructured interview guide with public health clinic staff of varying disciplines (n= 25) in a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children. All interviews were audio recorded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results: We found five descriptive themes related to acceptability and feasibility of screening for perinatal depression in a public health clinic. The main themes include (1) literacy barriers, (2) need for referrals and follow-up with outside services, (3) training and capacity needs, (4) stigma of depression, and (5) location and privacy of screening. Although multiple barriers to universal depression screening in a public health clinic were identified, participants found value in practice of screening low-income women for depression. Conclusion: Factors for facilitating implementation of systematic depression screening in a public health clinic have been identified. Implications discuss how policy makers and public health clinic administrators can improve the universal depression screening process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-309
Number of pages5
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Food Assistance
Depression
Public Health
Administrative Personnel
Interviews
Privacy
Women's Health
Focus Groups
Mood Disorders
Practice Guidelines
Mental Health
Referral and Consultation

Keywords

  • (4-5): Perinatal depression screening
  • Maternal health
  • Public health clinic
  • WIC
  • Women's mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Perinatal depression screening in a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program : Perception of feasibility and acceptability among a multidisciplinary staff. / Tabb, Karen M.; Choi, Shinwoo; Pineros-Leano, Maria; Meline, Brandon; McDonald, Hellen G.; Kester, Rachel; Huang, Hsiang.

In: General Hospital Psychiatry, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.07.2015, p. 305-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tabb, Karen M. ; Choi, Shinwoo ; Pineros-Leano, Maria ; Meline, Brandon ; McDonald, Hellen G. ; Kester, Rachel ; Huang, Hsiang. / Perinatal depression screening in a Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program : Perception of feasibility and acceptability among a multidisciplinary staff. In: General Hospital Psychiatry. 2015 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 305-309.
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