PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK EFFECTS IN TRAINING: THE ROLE OF PERCEIVED CONTROLLABILITY

JOSEPH J. MARTOCCHIO, JAMES DULEBOHN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A field experiment with 86 employees tested whether performance feedback that attributes past performance to factors within trainees' control would result in heightened software efficacy, goal commitment, positive mood, and learning, compared to feedback that attributes past performance to factors outside trainees' control. In addition, we assessed whether the use of feedback would produce a Galatea effect, or gain in trainees' performance that is the result of a boost in their self‐efficacy. The results show that trainees who received feedback that attributed their performance to factors within their control had higher software efficacy. Software efficacy was positively related to learning (both declarative knowledge and compilation). Contrary to our expectations, feedback did not influence goal commitment or positive mood. Further, a statistically significant Galatea effect was not obtained; however, feedback that attributes performance to factors outside trainees' control was related to a decrease in software efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-373
Number of pages17
JournalPersonnel Psychology
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

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