Perceptions of non-caregiving roles among siblings of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Chung Eun Lee, Meghan M. Burke, Catherine K. Arnold, Aleksa Owen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Siblings have the longest familial tie. Further, when a disability is present in the family, siblings may also fulfil various roles for their brothers and sisters with intellectual and developmental disabilities, such as friend, role model, caregiver, and guardian. To date, most research has focused on the caregiving roles of siblings. However, many siblings do not anticipate fulfilling caregiving roles; yet there is little extent research examining the perceptions of adult siblings toward non-caregiving roles. Thus, it is important to identify other perceived roles of adult siblings of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This study involved the secondary analysis of a national dataset of 70 non-caregiving, adult siblings of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the United States. Such perceived roles included supporter, typical sibling, no role, service coordinator, guardian, advocate, and emergency contact person. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-127
Number of pages10
JournalResearch and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2018

Keywords

  • Sibling caregiver
  • adults with disabilities
  • non-caregiving role

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology
  • Rehabilitation

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