Perceived message sensation value and psychological reactance: A test of the dominant thought disruption hypothesis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study tests to see whether perceived message sensation value reduces psychological reactance within the context of anti-marijuana ads for television. After controlling for sensation seeking, biological sex, and marijuana use, the results indicate that message novelty is negatively associated with a freedom threat, whereas dramatic impact and emotional arousal were not associated with the antecedent to reactance. Results support the use of novel messages in future ads while at the same time offer an explanation to the challenges involved in creating effective anti-marijuana ads. Overall, the results provide partial support for the dominant thought disruption hypothesis and are discussed with an emphasis on the theoretical and practical implications for health communication researchers and practitioners.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1024-1038
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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