Patterns of individualism and collectivism across the United States

Joseph A. Vandello, Dov Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although the individualism-collectivism dimension is usually examined in a U.S. versus Asian context, there is variation within the United States. The authors created an eight-item index ranking states in terms of collectivist versus individualist tendencies. As predicted, collectivist tendencies were strongest in the Deep South, and individualist tendencies were strongest in the Mountain West and Great Plains. In Part 2, convergent validity for the index was obtained by showing that state collectivism scores predicted variation in individual attitudes, as measured by a national survey. In Part 3, the index was used to explore the relationship between individualism-collectivism and a variety of demographic, economic, cultural, and health-related variables. The index may be used to complement traditional measures of collectivism and individualism and may be of use to scholars seeking a construct to account for unique U.S. regional variation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-292
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1999

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collectivism
individualism
Economics
Demography
Health
regional difference
ranking
Surveys and Questionnaires
health
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Patterns of individualism and collectivism across the United States. / Vandello, Joseph A.; Cohen, Dov.

In: Journal of personality and social psychology, Vol. 77, No. 2, 01.08.1999, p. 279-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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