Patient research on the slapstick lots: From trick men to special effects artists in silent Hollywood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In special effects scholarship, the transformation of the "trick man" to "special effects artist" is a commonplace cliché. However, examining professional and journalistic discourse of the 1910s and 1920s reveals that these terms and several others were actively debated in effects circles, in order to raise their professional standing and attract more specialized work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-173
Number of pages22
JournalEarly Popular Visual Culture
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2015

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artist
discourse
Special Effects
Artist
Hollywood
Slapstick
Trick
1920s
Commonplaces
1910s
Journalistic Discourse
Professional Discourse

Keywords

  • Dunning Process
  • Silent cinema
  • Special effects
  • Technology
  • Williams Process

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts
  • History

Cite this

Patient research on the slapstick lots : From trick men to special effects artists in silent Hollywood. / Turnock, Julie.

In: Early Popular Visual Culture, Vol. 13, No. 2, 03.04.2015, p. 152-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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