Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows

Raqeeb Thameem, Bhargav Rallabandi, Sascha Hilgenfeldt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number014124
JournalBiomicrofluidics
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Acoustic streaming
Microbubbles
classifying
Sorting
Equipment and Supplies
bubbles
Particle Size
Ultrasonics
flow geometry
Geometry
particle trajectories
channel flow
Channel flow
geometry
microchannels
Microchannels
laminar flow
Flow patterns
flow distribution
ultrasonics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Genetics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows. / Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha.

In: Biomicrofluidics, Vol. 10, No. 1, 014124, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thameem, Raqeeb ; Rallabandi, Bhargav ; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha. / Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows. In: Biomicrofluidics. 2016 ; Vol. 10, No. 1.
@article{0b0c06c2d4d24203adadb5e7a9690f3d,
title = "Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows",
abstract = "Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.",
author = "Raqeeb Thameem and Bhargav Rallabandi and Sascha Hilgenfeldt",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1063/1.4942458",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
journal = "Biomicrofluidics",
issn = "1932-1058",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows

AU - Thameem, Raqeeb

AU - Rallabandi, Bhargav

AU - Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.

AB - Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959450635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959450635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1063/1.4942458

DO - 10.1063/1.4942458

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - Biomicrofluidics

JF - Biomicrofluidics

SN - 1932-1058

IS - 1

M1 - 014124

ER -