Parents' peer restriction in the United States and China: A longitudinal study of early adolescents

Yu Xiong, Eva M. Pomerantz, Lili Qin, Meifang Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This research examined parents' restriction of children's peer relationships in the United States and China. American and Chinese children (N = 934; Mage = 12.67 years) reported on their parents' peer restriction (e.g., limiting children's time with peers) and their behavioral and psychological adjustment 3 times over a year. Increments in parents' peer restriction predicted decrements in children's adjustment over time to a similar extent in the United States and China. However, decrements in children's adjustment predicted increments in parents' peer restriction over time to a greater extent in the United States (vs. China). Thus, it is possible that culture contributes to the socialization process involving parents' restriction of children's peer relationships but only via child-driven pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1760-1774
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume56
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • China
  • Culture
  • Parental peer management
  • Parenting
  • Peers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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