Parenting, Effortful Control, and Adolescents’ Externalizing Problem Behavior: Moderation by Dopaminergic Genes

M. Van Heel, P. Bijttebier, S. Claes, H. Colpin, L. Goossens, B. Hankin, W. Van Den Noortgate, K. Verschueren, J. Young, K. Van Leeuwen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Research shows that genetics and effortful control play an important role in the link between parenting and problem behavior. However, little is known about how these factors act simultaneously. This article used a moderated mediation model to examine whether effortful control mediated the link between parenting and externalizing problem behavior, and whether dopaminergic genes (i.e., polygenic index score including DAT1, DRD2, DRD4, COMT) moderated this link. Two three-wave studies were conducted on community samples (adolescents: Study 1: N = 457; Mage = 15.74; Study 2: N = 221; Mage = 12.84). There was no mediation by effortful control, but a moderation by dopaminergic reactivity was observed. Despite inconsistent evidence, this article indicates that the development of externalizing problem behavior is subject to genetic characteristics and parenting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)252-266
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Dopamine
  • Effortful control
  • Externalizing problem behavior
  • Parenting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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