Parent perspectives of applying mindfulness-based stress reduction strategies to special education

Meghan M. Burke, Neilson Chan, Cameron L. Neece

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Parents of children with (versus without) intellectual and developmental disabilities report greater stress; such stress may be exacerbated by dissatisfaction with school services, poor parent-school partnerships, and the need for parent advocacy. Increasingly, mindfulness interventions have been used to reduce parent stress. However, it is unclear whether parents apply mindfulness strategies during the special education process to reduce school-related stress. To investigate whether mindfulness may reduce school-related stress, interviews were conducted with 26 parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities who completed a mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention. Participants were asked about their stress during meetings with the school, use of mindfulness strategies in communicating with the school, and the impact of such strategies. The majority of parent participants reported: special education meetings were stressful; they used mindfulness strategies during IEP meetings; and such strategies affected parents' perceptions of improvements in personal well-being, advocacy, family-school relationships, and access to services for their children. Implications for future research, policy, and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-180
Number of pages14
JournalIntellectual and developmental disabilities
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Mindfulness
Special Education
special education
parents
Parents
school
Developmental Disabilities
Intellectual Disability
disability
Disabled Children
Interviews
well-being

Keywords

  • Family-school relationships
  • Individualized education programs
  • Intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Mindfulness-based stress reduction
  • Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Community and Home Care
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Parent perspectives of applying mindfulness-based stress reduction strategies to special education. / Burke, Meghan M.; Chan, Neilson; Neece, Cameron L.

In: Intellectual and developmental disabilities, Vol. 55, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 167-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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