Parent binge eating and restrictive feeding practices: Indirect effects of parent's responses to child's negative emotion

Jaclyn A. Saltzman, Janet M. Liechty, Kelly K. Bost, Barbara H. Fiese, Kristen Harrison, Kelly Bost, Brent McBride, Sharon Donovan, Diana Grigsby-Toussaint, Juhee Kim, Angela Wiley, Margarita Teran-Garcia, Barbara Fiese, the STRONG Kids Program

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Parents' emotion regulation difficulties are related to binge eating (BE), and to responses to children's negative emotion. However, less is known about how responses to children's negative emotion are related to eating and feeding in the parenting context. We examined the degree to which BE had both direct and indirect effects on parental restrictive feeding practices, through parents' reported responses to negative emotion. Method: Parents of preschoolers (n = 441) completed validated questionnaires about their feeding strategies, responses to children's negative emotion, and their children's eating behaviors. Height and weight were measured in children and self-reported by parents. Unsupportive (Distress, Minimizing, and Punitive), and Supportive (Emotion-focused, Problem-focused, and Expressive Encouragement) responses to negative emotion were measured using the Coping with Children's Negative Emotions Scale. Results: Parent's BE was correlated with Distress responses, Restriction for health, and Restriction for weight control. Controlling for confounders, BE was associated with Restriction for weight control, and Restriction for health. Model testing revealed that BE had significant direct (R2 [SE] =.073 [.031], 95% CI [.013,.134]) and indirect effects (R2 [SE] =.011 [.005], 95% CI [.003,.023]) on Restriction for weight control, through Distress responses, but only indirect effects on Restriction for health (R2 [SE] =.018 [.009], 95% CI [.004,.039]). Conclusions: This study shows an association between emotion regulation and energy-intake regulation in the parenting context. Efforts to modify feeding practices may be more effective if parents' eating behaviors and their emotional responsiveness to distress are taken into account.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-154
Number of pages5
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume21
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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Bulimia
Emotions
Parents
Weights and Measures
Parenting
Feeding Behavior
Health
Child Behavior
Energy Intake
Eating

Keywords

  • Binge eating
  • Emotion
  • Emotion regulation
  • Energy regulation
  • Feeding behavior
  • Parental feeding practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Parent binge eating and restrictive feeding practices : Indirect effects of parent's responses to child's negative emotion. / Saltzman, Jaclyn A.; Liechty, Janet M.; Bost, Kelly K.; Fiese, Barbara H.; Harrison, Kristen; Bost, Kelly; McBride, Brent; Donovan, Sharon; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana; Kim, Juhee; Wiley, Angela; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Fiese, Barbara; the STRONG Kids Program.

In: Eating Behaviors, Vol. 21, 01.04.2016, p. 150-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saltzman, Jaclyn A. ; Liechty, Janet M. ; Bost, Kelly K. ; Fiese, Barbara H. ; Harrison, Kristen ; Bost, Kelly ; McBride, Brent ; Donovan, Sharon ; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana ; Kim, Juhee ; Wiley, Angela ; Teran-Garcia, Margarita ; Fiese, Barbara ; the STRONG Kids Program. / Parent binge eating and restrictive feeding practices : Indirect effects of parent's responses to child's negative emotion. In: Eating Behaviors. 2016 ; Vol. 21. pp. 150-154.
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abstract = "Objective: Parents' emotion regulation difficulties are related to binge eating (BE), and to responses to children's negative emotion. However, less is known about how responses to children's negative emotion are related to eating and feeding in the parenting context. We examined the degree to which BE had both direct and indirect effects on parental restrictive feeding practices, through parents' reported responses to negative emotion. Method: Parents of preschoolers (n = 441) completed validated questionnaires about their feeding strategies, responses to children's negative emotion, and their children's eating behaviors. Height and weight were measured in children and self-reported by parents. Unsupportive (Distress, Minimizing, and Punitive), and Supportive (Emotion-focused, Problem-focused, and Expressive Encouragement) responses to negative emotion were measured using the Coping with Children's Negative Emotions Scale. Results: Parent's BE was correlated with Distress responses, Restriction for health, and Restriction for weight control. Controlling for confounders, BE was associated with Restriction for weight control, and Restriction for health. Model testing revealed that BE had significant direct (R2 [SE] =.073 [.031], 95{\%} CI [.013,.134]) and indirect effects (R2 [SE] =.011 [.005], 95{\%} CI [.003,.023]) on Restriction for weight control, through Distress responses, but only indirect effects on Restriction for health (R2 [SE] =.018 [.009], 95{\%} CI [.004,.039]). Conclusions: This study shows an association between emotion regulation and energy-intake regulation in the parenting context. Efforts to modify feeding practices may be more effective if parents' eating behaviors and their emotional responsiveness to distress are taken into account.",
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AU - Saltzman, Jaclyn A.

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AU - Fiese, Barbara H.

AU - Harrison, Kristen

AU - Bost, Kelly

AU - McBride, Brent

AU - Donovan, Sharon

AU - Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana

AU - Kim, Juhee

AU - Wiley, Angela

AU - Teran-Garcia, Margarita

AU - Fiese, Barbara

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N2 - Objective: Parents' emotion regulation difficulties are related to binge eating (BE), and to responses to children's negative emotion. However, less is known about how responses to children's negative emotion are related to eating and feeding in the parenting context. We examined the degree to which BE had both direct and indirect effects on parental restrictive feeding practices, through parents' reported responses to negative emotion. Method: Parents of preschoolers (n = 441) completed validated questionnaires about their feeding strategies, responses to children's negative emotion, and their children's eating behaviors. Height and weight were measured in children and self-reported by parents. Unsupportive (Distress, Minimizing, and Punitive), and Supportive (Emotion-focused, Problem-focused, and Expressive Encouragement) responses to negative emotion were measured using the Coping with Children's Negative Emotions Scale. Results: Parent's BE was correlated with Distress responses, Restriction for health, and Restriction for weight control. Controlling for confounders, BE was associated with Restriction for weight control, and Restriction for health. Model testing revealed that BE had significant direct (R2 [SE] =.073 [.031], 95% CI [.013,.134]) and indirect effects (R2 [SE] =.011 [.005], 95% CI [.003,.023]) on Restriction for weight control, through Distress responses, but only indirect effects on Restriction for health (R2 [SE] =.018 [.009], 95% CI [.004,.039]). Conclusions: This study shows an association between emotion regulation and energy-intake regulation in the parenting context. Efforts to modify feeding practices may be more effective if parents' eating behaviors and their emotional responsiveness to distress are taken into account.

AB - Objective: Parents' emotion regulation difficulties are related to binge eating (BE), and to responses to children's negative emotion. However, less is known about how responses to children's negative emotion are related to eating and feeding in the parenting context. We examined the degree to which BE had both direct and indirect effects on parental restrictive feeding practices, through parents' reported responses to negative emotion. Method: Parents of preschoolers (n = 441) completed validated questionnaires about their feeding strategies, responses to children's negative emotion, and their children's eating behaviors. Height and weight were measured in children and self-reported by parents. Unsupportive (Distress, Minimizing, and Punitive), and Supportive (Emotion-focused, Problem-focused, and Expressive Encouragement) responses to negative emotion were measured using the Coping with Children's Negative Emotions Scale. Results: Parent's BE was correlated with Distress responses, Restriction for health, and Restriction for weight control. Controlling for confounders, BE was associated with Restriction for weight control, and Restriction for health. Model testing revealed that BE had significant direct (R2 [SE] =.073 [.031], 95% CI [.013,.134]) and indirect effects (R2 [SE] =.011 [.005], 95% CI [.003,.023]) on Restriction for weight control, through Distress responses, but only indirect effects on Restriction for health (R2 [SE] =.018 [.009], 95% CI [.004,.039]). Conclusions: This study shows an association between emotion regulation and energy-intake regulation in the parenting context. Efforts to modify feeding practices may be more effective if parents' eating behaviors and their emotional responsiveness to distress are taken into account.

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