Owners, floaters and competitive asymmetries among territorial red-winged blackbirds

Christopher G. Eckert, Patrick J. Weatherhead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In an eastern Ontario population of red-winged blackbirds, Agelaius phoeniceus, some males were unsuccessful in obtaining a breeding territory and consequently existed as 'floaters'. However, not all floaters were inferior to territory owners with respect to two morphological correlates of social dominance status: wing length and epaulette length. Floaters who replaced experimentally removed owners were not smaller and did not have smaller epaulettes than owners. Ownership changed on 26·8% of 71 territories that were closely monitored and on 64·0% of 25 spot-checked territories. A considerable proportion of these changes in ownership appeared to be territory take-overs by intruding males. However, owners involved in these turnovers were not smaller and did not have smaller epaulettes than either the incoming males who succeeded them or the other territory owners who were not involved in turnovers. Overall, the data did not support the hypothesis that owner/floater status is determined by asymmetries in morphological features associated with competitive ability among males competing for a limited number of territories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1317-1323
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1987
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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