Ove Arup's total design, integrated project delivery, and the role of the engineer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sir Ove N. Arup's total architecture was an organizational and philosophical set of guidelines for the working engineer, and at its best, it was a standard for the whole design team. In 2007, the American Institute of Architects created a system to implement integrative practice entitled Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) to reorganize not only how a project team works, but when time is invested in designing. This paper examines the role of engineers in IPD through the lens of Arup's ideas, which are still seen as inspiration for practitioners. The philosophy behind IPD is examined through its definitive Guide and the application through a series of documented case studies. A comparison of Arup's philosophy and the structure of IPD demonstrates the position of engineers and how they are valued in an IPD project, leading to the conclusion that IPD falls short of capitalizing on the potential of the engineer as partner in integrated design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-113
Number of pages12
JournalArchitectural Science Review
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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Keywords

  • Sir Ove Arup
  • architectural design
  • engineering profession
  • integrated design
  • integrated project delivery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Architecture

Cite this

Ove Arup's total design, integrated project delivery, and the role of the engineer. / Uihlein, Marci Smith.

In: Architectural Science Review, Vol. 59, No. 2, 03.03.2016, p. 102-113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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