Outcome of dogs with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas treated with and without adjuvant doxorubicin chemotherapy: 39 Cases (1996-2004)

Kim A. Selting, Barbara E. Powers, Laura J. Thompson, Elise Mittleman, Jeff W. Tyler, Mary H. Lafferty, Stephen J. Withrow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective - To examine the effect of adjuvant doxorubicin chemotherapy on outcome in dogs with high-grade (grade 3) soft tissue sarcomas (HGSTSs). Design-Retrospective case series. Animals-39 dogs. Procedures - Medical records of dogs with HGSTSs were reviewed. Dogs treated with surgery alone or receiving single-agent doxorubicin chemotherapy postoperatively were included in the study. Owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up information. Slides from histologic sections were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis of HGSTSs. Cases in which follow-up examination was not performed and radiation therapy or chemotherapy other than doxorubicin was administered were excluded. Results - 39 dogs met inclusion criteria. Twenty-one dogs received adjuvant doxorubicin. Tumor-, patient-, and treatment-related variables were not significantly associated with measured outcomes including local, metastatic, and overall disease-free intervals as well as survival time. Overall median disease-free interval was 724 days with a median survival time of 856 days for all dogs. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Adjuvant doxorubicin-based chemotherapy did not benefit this population of dogs with HGSTSs. Outcome for visceral HGSTSs was similar to that of nonvisceral HGSTSs in these cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1442-1448
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume227
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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